Sibling Support

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The other day I had a patient (10yo) come into the ER with her mother and younger sister (6yo) via ambulance for a laceration. The two girls were doing backflips into the pool and well, one of those backflips didn’t end so well. I went into the room and the patient seemed to be coping very well. I provided a procedural teaching for the patient, sibling, and mother, answered her questions, and developed a coping strategy (counting to 10 and taking deep breaths). I also set up the girls with a movie and some coloring sheets to pass the time before the procedure started. When the time came, I was ready to be present for the procedure but noticed that mom was helping her daughter cope very well and that the person that really needed support was the little sister! She was sitting on a chair in the corner covering her ears and shutting her eyes as tightly as she could (the doctor was still setting up her supplies). I asked if it would be alright if little sister and I waited outside and both mom and little sister agreed.

She and I sat at a nearby table outside of sister’s room and made her a Get Well card. It was at this time that little sister started to explain to me how scary it was when her sister hit her head at the pool, how scary the ambulance ride was because they were going really fast, and how she’s scared about what they’re doing to her sister. I addressed all of these fears with little sister, all the while validating her feelings and helping her cope with the scary Sunday she was experiencing. I gave her the opportunity to tell me her side of the story of what happened at the pool. I was able to teach her a little bit about the ambulance and how they help get people to the hospital quickly and safely. And, I did my procedure teaching again, more slowly, and made sure she understood and felt comfortable with the steps. I was even able to show her my Mermaid ( https://adventuresinchildlife.com/2014/07/14/iv-sutures-prep-doll/ ) so that she could see & feel what the sutures would feel like afterwards. In the end she was more relaxed, understanding, and most importantly confident & comfortable to walk back into her sister’s room when the procedure was over.

It’s clear that in this scenario little sister needed support from her Child Life Specialist! It’s easy to develop a “tunnel vision” when working with patients and addressing their needs and concerns but it’s important to always remember to be alert and aware of family members and how they’re coping, too!

  

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One thought on “Sibling Support

  1. It can be so hard to leave the procedure room sometimes- even when the person who needs the most support is the sibling! I have had a similar situation (except instead of a lac it was constipation and enemas!) and I just cleared it with Mom and felt so great about what I could offer the sibling. I think it surprised staff as well, but it just shows how many ways we can use our skills. Nice job!

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