Favorite Find

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I am so excited to have signed up for a 3-day kids yoga teacher training which is coming to Miami next month. Let me start off by saying I’m not a yoga teacher nor would I consider myself a yogi. My experience with yoga is nothing more than the occasional free class at the park or gym every now and then. Maybe a back bend or two at home when I’m in need of a good stretch, but nothing more.

About a week ago I stumbled upon Rainbow Kids Yoga – a company that focuses on giving its students the tools they need to teach yoga to children and families around the world. By glancing at their class schedule, it’s easy to see Rainbow Kids is everywhere – around the US, Europe, South America – everywhere!

How can this class help me as a child life specialist? These are just a few items on the agenda that I know I can use in my day-to-day work as a CCLS: Making yoga work for different age groups, breath and yogic breath for kids, yoga for children with additional needs, relaxation and guided imagery for children, meditation for different age groups

Aside from enhancing my clinical skills, I will also be able to teach children yoga on my free time if I desire as I will have “Registered Children Yoga Teacher (RCYT) status”.

*Cough* *Cough* To all those child life students looking for credentials to spice up their resume’s and stand out in a crowd of applications – look into this! 

Stay tuned for a part 2 of this post after I complete the training!

For an overview of the training click here: http://www.rainbowyogatraining.com/3-day-kids-yoga

You can see the class schedule & register for the upcoming class in Miami here: https://events.bizzabo.com/201924/agenda

 

Favorite Find of the Month

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I first learned about the child life profession when one of my child development professors my junior year of college very briefly mentioned it during one of his lectures. I jotted down “child life specialist” on the corner of my notebook and googled it when I got home. As soon as I looked it up, I knew this was it! I read every single word written on the entire child life council website but I still wanted more! I wanted to know what a typical day looked like for a CLS, I wanted to see pictures of their workspace, I wanted as much information as I could get to feel confident in my decision to pursue this career. I didn’t find what I was looking for that day so I started adventures in child life in hopes of providing others with what I was looking for at the start of my adventure. 

It’s no secret that becoming a certified child life specialist is a lot of work! And how can you be sure that you’re ready to do all that it takes to become a child life specialist when you’ve never even seen what the job entails first hand? I get a lot of e-mails from people interested in the field asking me how they can be sure child life is for them before they dive in. I often asked myself this question too during the early stages of my adventure. I realized that child life was for me by truly understanding what the job entailed and see the magic first hand during my time volunteering, my practicum, my internship, and even during as a professional. This brings me to my favorite find of the month:

 

John Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida will be hosting a seminar for those interested in learning more about the child life profession. This seminar will include a panel discussion with child life staff, information about education options & certification requirements, a hospital tour, and exposure to therapeutic activities. There are two seminars left this year – one will take place on July 27th and the other on November 16th. Space is limited to 25 participants per seminar so make sure and register online ASAP!

To see the flyer for the event, click here https://www.hopkinsallchildrens.org/getmedia/792ad66a-178e-43b5-9116-8ccb6f983e9c/DayInTheLife

Grad School Update

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I am so excited to announce that I will be graduating this summer with my masters degree in developmental disabilities with a concentration in child life from Nova Southeastern University! During my time in grad school, I received many e-mails from prospective students asking about graduate degree in child life. Here are some of the FAQ’s I received.

  • Which program is better? Nova’s or Bank Streets? Deciding which university to attend for grad school depends on you and what you are wanting to gain with your degree – there is no right or wrong answer. From my understanding, the program at Bank Street is solely focused on child life while the program at Nova is focused on developmental disabilities with a concentration in child life. Again, this all depends on what you’re wanting to achieve with your degree.
  • How were you able to complete the internship requirement for Nova if you’re already working as a CCLS? Because I am already a certified child life specialist, I was not required to complete an internship.
  • I’m horrible with online classes, how do you manage? I’ve never been a fan of online classes either, but keep in mind that graduate school is very different from undergrad! Grad school is all about reading independently, researching independently, writing papers, and an occasional lecture here and there. While I would have never picked up an online course during undergrad, I am so happy my entire graduate school curriculum was able to be done online. I never had an issue with miscommunication with of my professors, I was able to stick to my normal work schedule and attend class/do homework on my free time, and there was no added stress of driving to school and finding parking. Whenever I needed assistance with anything academic, I received prompt answers via e-mail or telephone. It’s 2016, take advantage of the technology available for us!
  • How was the application process? I started at Nova during the fall of 2014. In order to apply for the program, I had to write a personal statement about why I’m interested in the program, provide 2 letters of recommendation, provide my official transcripts from undergrad, and have a phone interview.
  • What has been the most difficult part about grad school? Grad school is something you need to really want to accomplish for yourself. There is a lot of reading, a lot of papers, and not as many quizzes and exams. By now I let out a sigh of relief when my paper only needs to be 10 pages long! Prioritization and work-life balance are key for staying on track with grad school. Many students completing this program are also working full-time jobs/beginning their careers so you can’t exactly call out from work to pull an all-nighter before a deadline (well, maybe… just kidding!). I can honestly say what I found most challenging about grad school is learning how to perfectly write in APA format! No matter how much I double checked my work, I’d always get a few points off here or there because I wrote out someone’s first name rather than just writing their first initial. However, like all things you learn and become accustomed to new ways of doing things. If you’re having trouble with APA, here are a few of my favorite websites: