This blog post on the Children’s Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota follows Child Life Specialist Mindy Teele though a busy night in the emergency room. There are also some videos showing preparation and distraction.

Source: http://www.childrensmn.org/blog/kidshealth/2013/03/a-night-in-the-ed-with-a-child-life-specialist/

While searching around Georgetown University Hospital’s Child Life resources page, I found this awesome list of books that may be helpful to children dealing with hospitalization. Check it out!

Helpful Books about Hospitalization

A book is a great way to start explaining different things your child may see in a hospital. These are some recommendations.

  • A Hospital Story: An Open Family Book for Parents and Children Together By Sara Bonnett Stein (Walker and Co., 1983)
  • A Visit to the Sesame Street Hospital By Deborah Hautzig (Random House, 1985)
  • At the Hospital By Amy Moses (Child’s World, 1997)
  • Barney and Baby Bop Go to the Doctor By Margie Larsen, Dennis Full (Scholastic)
  • Coping with a Hospital Stay By Sharon Carter and Judy Monnig (Rosen Publishing Group, 1987)
  • Curious George Goes to the Hospital By Anne Civardi (EDC Publishing, 1994)
  • Going to the Hospital By Fred Rogers (GP/Putnam’s Sons, 1988)
  • Let’s Talk About Going to the Hospital By Marianne Johnson (Powerkids Press, 1998)
  • The Hospital Scares Me By Paula Hogan and Kirk Hogan (Raintree Steck-Vaughn Publishers, 1990)
  • This is a Hospital, Not a Zoo By R. Karim (Truesdell Services, 1998)
  • When Molly was in the Hospital: A Book for Brothers and Sisters of Hospitalized Children By Debbie Duncan (Rayve Productions, 1994)
  • Why am I going to the Hospital By Claire Ciliotta and Carole Livingston (Lyle Stuart Inc., 1981)

Source: http://www.georgetownuniversityhospital.org/body.cfm?id=557023

Image Source: Amazon.com

I was able to find two options of these fun print outs that would be great for any medical play session! The first option is not free to print out, but there is a sample you can print to get a feel for what you can expect if you buy them. The second option is totally free to download after you make an account with the company you’re downloading it from. I’d say it’s worth it! They are very cool!

The second option of print outs are free and

Source:

Option 1: http://growingplay.blogspot.com/2012/04/pretend-play-box-doctor-hospital.html

Option 2: http://professorpoppins.blogspot.com/2013/03/doctor-pretend-play-kit.html

“Comfort holds are used by parents and caregivers during treatments to reduce stress and anxiety in the child and help immobilize an arm or leg for procedures.” The following link has some information on different comfort holds & procedures they can be done for. 

Source: http://www.chkd.org/Services/ChildLife/ComfortPositions.aspx

Any ideas on how to decorate a teenagers hospital bedroom besides sheets and pillows? She’ll be in for a month!

Posters! The Beatles? Lebron James? Adele? The Twilight Saga?  – whatever your teen is motivated by & loves it would be an awesome idea to have something up that can provide a sense of love and comfort in their hospital room. Allow your teen to personalize their room as much as possible with permission granted from hospital staff.

Calendar. In this particular case the teen will be in the hospital for about a month so it would be an awesome idea to have a calendar up for her to be able to keep track of doctor visits, fun activities within the hospital, and to chart her progress.

A white board (if one not in room already) or a big poster. For family and friends to leave inspiring messages on when they pass by for a visit. Contact with peers is extremely important for teens and so being able to read messages from their friends after they’ve left could be very comforting for a teen in the hospital.

Bedding/Pillows/Rugs. If allowed by your nurses and doctors, bringing in these items from home will make their room more customized to their liking. Also, the smell of home will linger around them for a while making the first couple of nights in the hospital a little more comforting.

Photo frames with photos of friends. Again, maintaining peer relationships is crucial for teens and so keeping framed photos of them around is a nice touch for personalizing their room.

New things waiting for her at the hospital. Take into consideration new things that she may be encountering at the hospital. For example, perhaps an IV pole – she could take something from home to hang on it & make it her own. Maybe she would be interested in picking out her own decal for her IV bags – check out  www.littlelovemedical.com

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Image Source(s): Google.com, Target.com, Littlelovemedical.com