Surgery prep

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Currently one of my favorite resources to use with my pre-op patients is this surgery prep book from Katie Mense. It’s very kid friendly (non-threatening), easy to follow, and free to download! Download your copy by clicking the link below. original-2467686-1

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/What-is-Surgery-Book-and-Medical-Leave-note-to-Students-2467686

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Teacher Toolbox

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I am so excited to finally have my teacher tool box up and running! I’ve always been very organized and now I’m able to have all of my expired/left over medical supplies nicely sorted. You can find your own teacher tool box on Amazon.com – click here. They sell lots of different sizes so make sure to look around for one that best meets your needs. As for the labels, I found mine on tacherspayteachers.com – shout out to Classroom Ispirations! You can click here  or you can simply search “teacher toolbox labels” on teacherspayteachers.com and find other themes. Many of them are free like the one I used!

Yoga + Child Life – Part II

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Part II:

Guided Imagery

Since early this year I have been providing child life services on the inpatient surgical and orthopedic unit. This has proven to be one of the best units for me to exercise my guided imagery and relaxation techniques as many patients need a support when being weaned off of pain medications. In the text book Meeting Children’s Psychosocial Needs Across the Health Care Continuum by Rollins, Bolig, and Mahan there is a story that impacted me greatly when I first read it as a child life student.

Indeed, the power of story to distract should not be taken lightly. In 1794, before the use of anesthetics, a young boy had surgery to remove a tumor. He was told such an interesting story during his operation that it absorbed his attention and removed pain from conscious awareness. Eighteen years later, this true believer in the power of story, Jacob Grimm, wrote Snow White (Hilgard & LeBaron, 1984 in Rollins et. al, 2005, p. 143)

Guided imagery has the power to not only take one’s mind somewhere else and away from the present but to change the way in which they view things. For example, a child with cancer imagining chemo as the superhero’s and cancer as the “bad guys”.

You can find many resources on guided imagery with a simple google search or even on Pinterest. My favorite resource for guided imagery is the book “Healing Images for Children: Teaching Relaxation and Guided Imagery to Children Facing Cancer and Other Serious Illnessesby Nancy Kelin51zw3SDfR8L._SX337_BO1,204,203,200_-1.jpg. I purchased this book during my practicum and have used it tremendously throughout my time as a student and as a CCLS. The book provides different guided imagery stories for you to read which center around different themes – some to help with pain management, some to help with nausea, some to help with waiting in doctor’s offices, etc.
Some resources you can use to help support your guided imagery session(s):

  • Eye masks to help with relaxation
  • Essential oils + diffuser for aromatherapy
  • Relaxing music/white noise – many free apps for Apple + Android available
  • A small stone/pebble to place on (older) patient’s forehead to help him/her keep still & focus on stone
  • A soft bristle paint brush to help patient focus on positive sensation on skin rather than pain

Remember, I’ve uploaded tons of freebies from teacherspayteachers.com on this subject. Click the link below to view:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B7up2fwr6___OXJ4MUlJRnNoNjg?usp=sharing

Yoga + Child Life – Part I

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You may remember at the end of last year I enrolled in the Rainbow Kids Yoga teacher training ( see post here ).  Let me start off by saying I am by no means an expert Yogi! I enrolled in this course not to deepen my practice or ditch child life to become a yoga teacher but rather to use the theory of yoga in my day to day as a CCLS. Fast forward 7 months after the Rainbow Kids Yoga training: it’s worth it!

I use the skills I learned with Rainbow Kids Yoga almost on a daily basis with my patients. So, what did I learn and how am I applying it to child life? For starters, it’s important to realize that yoga is more than just poses and flexibility. In fact, I don’t use yoga poses at all with my patients. What I do use is deep breathing exercises and guided imagery practices.

I have so much information and resources to share on this topic that I’ve decided to break up this post into 2 parts so stay tuned for more!

As a lover of free resources, I have set up a google drive where I’ve uploaded tons of freebies from teacherspayteachers.com on this subject. Click the link below to view:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B7up2fwr6___OXJ4MUlJRnNoNjg?usp=sharing

Part I:

Deep Breathing

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Any wise 7-year-old will be quick to tell you that breathing is important – we have to do it to stay alive! And while this is quite true, our breath also has a big impact on our mind and how we cope with experiences.  image-4722.jpgSee this picture example of how our breath changes as we become stressed. This is where yoga comes into action! By teaching children different breathing exercises during times of stress/anxiety, they will be able to slow their breathing thus helping them cope, remain calm, and feel a sense of control.

There are TONS of kids breathing exercises you can find with a quick google search. For example one of my favorites is Snake Breath – take a big breath in and as you exhale make a “Sssss” sound as long as you can. Another favorite of mine is Lion Breath – take a big breath in and as you exhale stick out your tongue and make sure to make your meanest lion roar face. Find inspiration online or make up your own! I made up Bubble Breath – inhale and pretend you’re blowing one really really big bubble as you exhale // inhale and pretend you’re blowing out millions of really little bubbles as you exhale. For some little ones the concept of “inhale” and “exhale” may not be appropriate so change up your terminology to something like “smell the flowers, blow the leaves” or “smell the birthday cake, blow out the candles”.

In an effort provide a visual for the patients and to help me remember so many different breathing techniques, I created a laminated breathing cards with different clip art depicting the type of breath.  Shout out to Gretchen Blackmer for the inspiration for these breathing cards http://www.everydaywarrioryoga.com/ 

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Another great tool to use to show patients the effects of breath is to use a  Hoberman Sphere.This is one of my favorite resources to help kids really understand how lungs open and close with each breath. Plus it’s an overall really cool toy and instant rapport builder in my opinion. I’ll guide my patients in doing the different breathing exercises with the Hoberman sphere so they can see the full effect.

Another great tool I’ve used to support my breathing exercises is the book “Breathe, Chill: A Handy Book of Games and Techniques Introduced Breathing, Meditation, and Relaxation to Kids and Teens” by Lisa Roberts. This book breaks down various types of breath and how/when/why to use them. After I purchased this book I read the testimonials on the back and saw one of them was written by a CCLS! Just goes to show how beneficial yoga practice can be in the field of Child Life. You can find this book here on Amazon. 51NfLPIAGjL._SX346_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

I’ve had many kiddos that really enjoy doing these deep breathing practices before/during/after procedures. I even had a patient choose my breathing cards over my iPad for distraction during her first IV! Not only do these skills help them cope with the present situation, but they walk away with a new coping technique in their pocket for future use & that’s what child life is all about!

 

 

Now arriving: NICU 

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A few weeks ago you may have noticed on my Instagram account I announced I was moving to a new unit. I have been quite busy transitioning over, orienting, and learning the ropes. However, I am so excited to let you all know that I am now working in NICU! I split my days between our orthopedic/surgery unit and NICU so I still see a wide range of patients/ages/diagnoses which I love. Stay tuned for more in the coming weeks on my transition into NICU. For now however, check out these milestone cards I made for our babies! They’ve been a huge hit with the families and staff; milestone cards are a great way to commemorate important events in these little ones lives.

Fun for EVERYONE

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I believe it’s important for every CCLS working in the hospital environment be knowledgeable on how to meet the unique needs of kids with developmental disabilities and their families. Often times, developmental disabilities are associated with chronic health conditions resulting in some sort of medical intervention(s) during their lifetime. That being said, these kiddo’s are often a top priority for me when I check my census each morning. So, how do I help these patients? Lots of ways!

  1. Play! Here’s a tactile stimulation activity I set up for one of my patients. Even though some kids are non-verbal, they still have likes and dislikes even when it comes to play. Ask mom/dad/caregiver for any preferences the patient may have. If it’s just you and the patient, figure it out! Talk to them,  laugh with them, play with them, see how they react when you help them engage in the different activities. The patient I took this activity to LOVED the feathers but she absolutely did NOT like the slime – haha!  IMG_6052.JPG
  2. Volunteers! Just like their typically developing peers, kids with special needs get bored too! Especially spending long hours in the hospital setting away from their routines. Don’t be afraid to have your volunteers visit these patients. Introduce your volunteer to the patient and model some appropriate play opportunities. Often times when I have patients that are admitted without family members at the bedside, I create an “about me” board as if written by the patient along with toys/activities I know the patient will enjoy. The “about me” boards are bright, handwritten, and easy to spot by any volunteer or staff that goes into the patient’s room. I write something along the lines of:
    • Hello Friend! My name is ______ and I am ____-years-old. Thank you for stopping by my room to play with me! Some of my favorite things to do are: listen to friends read to me, listen to the radio, squeeze play-doh in my hand, hold toys in my hand, and just have fun. There is a basket by the window where you will find some of my favorite toys and activities. If I need anything while we’re hanging out, my nurse’s phone number is on my whiteboard. I can’t wait to start having fun!Love, _________
      and Diane, my child life specialist (extension #)
  3. Resources! I’ve found many items that have proven to be very helpful for pediatric patients with special needs. Whether for support/distraction during a procedure, for relaxation and coping, or for recreational play, I’ve compiled a list of some of my favorites. Click: http://a.co/2wbxj0E   What are some of your favorite resources to offer this population?

There are tons and tons and TONS of resources out there on working with kids with developmental disabilities in the hospital. Do your research!

Still feeling a little nervous about helping patients with special needs? There’s no need to be nervous! They are just like their typically developing peers – yes… really, they are! One of my favorite pages on Facebook will prove it to you. Click here:  https://www.facebook.com/specialbooksbyspecialkids/

 

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Happy nurses week to each and every nurse I’ve had the pleasure of working with during my adventure in child life. Child life specialists are dedicated to making your job a little easier by keeping our patients (and their families) calm, distracted, and happy. You guys are rockstars! 💜💉💊🎉

Teddy Bear Clinic 

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Another fun event my team and I hosted in honor of child life month was a teddy bear clinic. This event is usually a great hit with the patients and families.

We started off by giving each “doctor” their patients chart. Here we included some information on the “top 10 reasons to call your child life specialist” as well as information on the different stations at the event.

 

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These are all of our “bear-y” sick patients. We contacted our marketing department and they had many bears with our hospital’s logo that they were happy to donate to us!

img_4854-1This first station is where our “doctors” would gown up and get ready to treat their patients. This was a very popular station and it was so adorable to see kids proudly walking around looking like doctors.

 

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The next station was triage followed by the IV station. We had a CCLS at each of these stations helping guide the “doctors” as they cared for their patient. Here is where we were able to sneak in our education & address misconceptions.

 

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Here’s a closer look at our triage station and IV station.

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Finally, the patients were able to do an x-ray by dipping our demo bear into white paint and smudging it on black paper. This was a very fun and creative way to incorporate medical art into our teddy war clinic.

Some other activities we had at the clinic were a photo booth station with props and a table with markers, crayons, and construction paper for the “doctors” to write a get well soon card to a patient in the hospital. We also included band-aids and gauze at this station to continue to promote medical art. Needless to say our clinic was a big success and all of our teddy bears were cured. Thanks, doctors!